Make a connection … Generate a spark … Get a donation

in Acquisition & Prospecting,Direct Mail,Integrated Multichannel Fundraising & Marketing

Want to spark a response?  Connect your fundraising, acquisition and cultivation messages correctly … and you generate a spark.  That spark inspires more prospects, donors and members to respond to your call-to-action.

What do I mean?

First, people need to be reassured each step of the way by seeing the answers to questions like these:

Is this really what I want to do?
Do I want to send them money for this today?
Am I doing this right?  Somewhere the letter said I was supposed to do something with the card I send back besides just fill in the amount.  What was that?
Exactly how will my money be used?
And on it goes!

Second, “connecting” each element (e.g., reply device to direct mail letter; email to a landing page), and each channel correctly achieves two critical tasks:

1 – Reassures your supporters that they’re doing the right thing; they’re on track; that they can make a difference with their gift

2 – Reinforces your message and call-to-action; helps supporters recognize that they have the correct piece of paper to send back, or that they’re on the correct page of your website

The result is a “spark” in the donor’s heart and mind.  A spark of reassurance and recognition that continues to propel them forward.

Let’s take one of the simplest integrated campaign examples: Direct mail package plus email.

Direct Mail Letter

The direct mail letter repeats the offer in the closing, the P.S., and on the reply device.  Everything within the package is connected and reinforces the value to the donor by responding to the offer.

You might also give donors the option of going online to give (or another call-to-action).  Use a vanity URL that’s easy to remember and is clearly tied to the theme of your letter.  You can also include a QR bar code on the reply device (smartphone scans it and takes donor directly to landing page designed for this specific campaign).

Landing Page

The landing page for the letter is the same as the one used for the email (Don’t worry, even with the same landing page you can track how they found you – letter versus email).

The landing page is NOT your standard donation page.  Use the same donation form but on this new page add a headline (text found in the letter and email) and a few lines of copy at the very top of the page.  Repeat the offer and the benefits to the donor.

This is your online reply device.  The copy at the top connects the landing page to the letter and the email.  Your theme is consistent.  Your messaging is consistent.  This reassures supporters they’re making the right decision, and helps them recognize that they’re on the correct web page.

Email

The email might be a reminder to give, or it could be a shorter variation of the direct mail letter.  After all, not all of your online subscribers are on your direct mail list (although if they’ve made a donation they ought to be), and not all of your direct mail recipients have given you their email address.

But the email follows the same theme, look and imagery of the letter.  And all the links direct people to the landing page.  Just remember, you can’t duplicate your direct mail letter in the email.  Each media (channel) has its own requirements and nuances.

Connections Generate Sparks

Follow the same guidelines for all the channels used for any given campaign.  The messaging is tweaked so it fits each channel, but the theme is consistent throughout.  It ought to be obvious to donors, prospects, and members that any message they see is all part of the same campaign.

Connecting all the elements within each channel … plus connecting each of the channels with the same theme, key phrases, etc. … generates sparks of recognition and reassurance in your supporters.

Those sparks inspire more of them to respond to your call-to-action.  More donors or members acquired.  More funds raisedElectrifying isn’t it?

Related posts:

Donor choices and integrated campaigns

Multiple channels is key approach: How and why donors of all ages give to charity